FRENCH PRONUNCIATION

French Pronunciation The greatest difficulty in pronouncing French is knowing which letters not to pronounce. Many French "silent" letters are facultative, being used only to indicate sounds that are pronounced under certain circumstances.

French pronunciation is the most difficult aspect of learning French for many students, particularly English speakers. It takes a lot of practice to pronounce French correctly, but if you really want to speak French, good pronunciation is essential. Nothing will kill a conversation faster than an inability to make yourself understood.

French Vowels

French pronunciation is the most difficult aspect of learning French for many students, particularly English speakers.

Pronouncing the 'Easy' Consonants

Of the 18 French consonants, b, d, f, k, l, p, t and v are pronounced pretty much as in English.

Pronouncing Difficult Consonants

French consonants are pronounced almost like in English, except that you don't linger on them; let them explode and move on to the vowel that follows.

Stress and Accent Marks

The French tonic accent is quite different than its English counterpart. In English, each word has one stressed syllable...

Pronouncing the French Vowels

French vowels are here separated into single vowels (accented and unaccented), and vowel groups. The letter 'e' is treated in other section. Note that the vowels 'i' and 'u' can generally be pronounced with consonant sounds.

Pronouncing the french Letter E

This ubiquitous letter can be pronounced in several different ways.

Pronouncing Nasal Vowels

Essential to any French caricature, nasal vowels are vowels pronounced through both the mouth and nose.

Pronouncing Vowel Groups

The following vowel letters in combination make single vowel sounds. Any other vowels that come together should be pronounced separately.



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